Jennifer Mabus

Dance Artist

Current Projects

Photo by Lynn Lane

2017

Mabus created a new work, How will I Recognize My Own Home?,  as part of Dance Source Houston’s Artist in Residence to be presented at the 2017 Barnstorm Dance Festival.

She also presented work with the Foundation for Modern Music at the Miller Outdoor Theater for the second year in a row, and making a new work in collaboration with costume designer, Barry Doss, at Sam Houston State University, as part of her Visiting Assistant Professorship.

As a performer, Mabus is continuing her collaborative improvisation performances with the sound artist, Lynn Lane, and the Transitory Sound and Movement Collective. She is also danced in a new work by Tawnya Kannarr at the Barnstorm Dance Festival.

For the Fall Season, Mabus will be creating a new Immersive Dance Theater work, Requiem, with the Pilot Dance Project, to be presented in the historic Morales Funeral Home in Houston on August 5, and she will be creating a new work at Arlington Heights High School in Fort Worth. She will also be performing her own Solo, Brightly Colored Paper, in the 254 Dance Festival (Waco, TX) and The Dance Exchange (Tulsa, OK).

Summer and Fall 2016

Mabus created new works for Muscle Memory Dance Theater, Contemporary Ballet Dallas, the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, and San Jacinto College. She is also presenting work in festivals, such as the (254) Dance Festival in Waco, TX and the Dance Gallery Festival in Houston, TX (Premiere).  She is performing a duet by and with John Beasant III, in New York City at Dixon Place and in the Dance Gallery Festival.

January 2016

postcard

Mabus presented The Art of Losing as one of Noble Motion Dance’s selected choreographers for the 2016 Next Step Series.  Mabus created “The Art of Losing” as a way to understand a family member’s descent into Alzheimer’s, and aimed to abstract the idea of memory and identity in order to create the physical experience of loss.  When we have lost everything, is there something essential to who we are that remains written in the body and the heart?

She collaborated with the artist Lynn Lane, who created and performed a responsive, improvisational soundscape.

December 2015

Paper Hearts

Inspired by love letters written in 1944 from her soldier great uncle to her dance-loving great aunt, Jennifer Mabus’ experiential evening-length dance work, “Paper Hearts,” explores the ways hearts reach out to each other across visible or invisible barriers. Her uncle writes, “The more I write to you the lonesomer I get.” Using these emotional sentiments, Mabus collaborated with ten well-known Houston dance artists to tell stories of vulnerability, companionship, loneliness, and love that exist through generations of families. Paper became a metaphor for the fragility of communication and of hearts.

This project was supported by the Rice Dance Program, a division of the Barbara and David Gibbs Recreation Department at Rice University

A portion of the ticket sales supported The Summerhouse, a full time educational program for young adults with intellectual disabilities. Summerhousehouston.org

April 2015

Mabus_DigitalSignage

Sam Houston State University Department of Dance, in collaboration with The Wynne Home Arts Center, presents If These Walls Could Speak, an Immersive Dance Theater evening choreographed and directed by MFA candidate Jennifer Mabus. Huntsville’s history and creativity will be highlighted in this one-of-a-kind evening thatwill take place throughout the entire grounds of The Wynne Home Arts Center on April 1 and 2, 2015. The audience will interact with dancers climbing on staircases, arguing around a dining room table, hiding in corners, and playing in the gardens. The viewers might even have a chance to dance themselves!

 If These Walls Could Speak is inspired by personal histories that houses and people collect. Twenty-five dance graduate and undergraduate students will be “telling stories” with dance spread throughout the entire house and garden of this historic turn-of-the-century home.